Balance


Remember who was lost, who was saved, the responders, and the soldiers, who was healed and the still healing…

Please support our Ground Zero workers, the brave responders who saved over 20,000 lives. These are the heroes who are still with us, and who deserve adequate care. You can help by visiting the FealGood Foundation

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Good kung fu! Marvel at the amazing expression of human excellence in this video: The Incredible Power of Concentration with artist Miyoko Shida. Be warned, there are no kicks or punches or fighting techniques, but this is an artistic and athletic example of real kung fu – great skill that demands discipline effort over time.

This feat epitomizes supreme mental concentration and expresses the zenith of balance and control of the human body. Although there is no apparent martial application, think again. If you can cultivate the equivalent mastery of mind, body and spirit, you will invariably become a superior martial artist what ever your style.

This video is for everyone. We urge impatient young warriors to slow down and watch the entire video to appreciate the great power of softness.

Be inspired,
Lawrence Tan

Photo by Toni Tan


“Be formless, shapeless, like water,” said Bruce Lee, echoing the words of the ancient Chinese philosopher Sun Tzu.

Written over two thousand years ago, Sun Tzu’s classic treatise Art of War uses water as a metaphor for strategies in managing conflict.

The theme of this year’s World Water Day is Water Cooperation.

We are facing growing issues surrounding water, conflict and survival. March 22 is World Water Day, and the start of World Water Week. The focus is to promote peace in transboundary water management through cooperation, not conflict. International waters are key natural resources ensuring our global future. Where they touch on more than one country, or are intercepted by a nation upstream, they are also a source of tension.

Conflicts arise among leaders, as these transboundary issues are deeply rooted in emotions –- water is necessary for survival. And it defines a culture’s opportunity for advancement. The challenge is not only to provide a sustainable clean water system, it is also learning to manage and share resources in an equitable way. Understanding historical water disputes and related treaties provide signposts for conflict resolution and aides in developing strategies for the future. Focusing on cooperation and joint action is essential to vital transboundary waters.

The resolution process requires a tremendous effort, great skill, programs and money. It also calls for awareness. Here’s how you can get involved

Lao Tze said, “The highest good is like water. Water nourishes the ten thousand things.”

Both water and cooperation are precious. Water is life. Communication is the path. No fighting.

Toni Tan

World Water Day

Faith is the bird that feels the light
and sings when the dawn is still dark.
~Tagore

Mockingbird, Toni Tan

speak truth

March 8, 2013. It is a day to imagine balance. And to celebrate the work of equilibrium. Achievement. Justice.

It is a day of global awareness…celebrating women — past and present, with the courage to make their voices heard. And for the future — the songs and struggles of daughters everywhere in this world, who deserve the human right to live their lives in balance and in peace…

Peace in our lives. Peace in our homes, our streets, our cities and towns, our countries, our world. OUR world.

Equity in our lives. Equity in our homes, our streets, our cities and towns, our countries, our world. OUR world.

Speak the truth even if your voice shakes….

International Women’s Day

IWD

Photo by Toni Tan

If there is to be any peace,
it will come through being,
not having.
~Henry Miller

In TanDao, we use this famous zen tale as a metaphor for long and winding path to martial arts mastery:

The Master’s Three Sons

Once upon a time two old kung fu masters were in a teahouse. One master asked, “How are your three sons progressing with their martial arts?”

“Let’s test them,” said the host. He took a heavy vase and placed it over a door so when opened the vase would fall. He called his youngest son, a strong youth who demonstrated powerful punches and kicks with fierce shouts.

“Pay your respects,” his father said. His son strutted over and shoved the door open. The vase crashed on his head but when it hit the floor he shattered it with a punch.

“Your boy is powerful,” said the guest. “He is young, one day he may understand power,” said the host, placing another vase over the door. He called his middle son, a tall youth who performed graceful and ferocious animal movements. When the youth pushed open the door he dodged and caught the vase as it fell. He bowed.

“Your second son has power and control,” complimented the visitor. “If he perseveres he may one day achieve true power.” the host said, putting up another vase. He called his eldest son.

After doing a slow moving meditation form, the son calmly walked towards the door. Noticing the vase, he reached up and took it down. He held it out while bowing, “Pleased to meet you, sir.”

“This is my number one son,” his father smiled. The visitor said, “Indeed, he is on his way to becoming a master”

Photo by Toni Tan

Three Stages of Mastery: Technical. Strategic. Intuitive.

The sons correspond to three different stages: technical (youngest son), strategic (middle son) and intuitive (eldest son). Each stage is a different mindset and focuses on a particular way of problem solving (the falling vase). The three sons express three alternative options reflecting their stage of development: the youngest son aggressively confronts the problem, the middle son strategically defuses the problem and the eldest, avoids the problem through mindful awareness.

Think about it.

Lawrence Tan

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